Aperture

Different Every Time

Canon 5D Mark II; 50mm f/1.4  |  f/2.5, 1/60 sec, ISO-400  |  Somewhere in Texas!

Canon 5D Mark II; 50mm f/1.4  |  f/2.5, 1/60 sec, ISO-400  |  Somewhere in Texas!

I love taking pictures of fire because you can never get the same shot!

Canon 5D Mark II; 50mm f/1.4  |  1st: f/7.1, 1/8 sec, ISO-800  |  2nd: f/2.5, 1/60 sec ISO-400

Canon 5D Mark II; 50mm f/1.4  |  1st: f/7.1, 1/8 sec, ISO-800  |  2nd: f/2.5, 1/60 sec ISO-400

Especially when you vary the settings. These two (above) have different aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings. You can see in the first one, the shutter speed is very slow. I didn't have a tripod, so I held it as still as I possibly could and it came out. If I had my tripod with me at that time, I would have experimented more with slow shutter speeds. Next time.

I like to experiment and try to push the limits on my knowledge and camera. Speaking of experimenting, I am very excited about some things coming from Amazon to my home in the next couple of days. For my recent birthday, some of my family gave me cash as a gift and I was able to purchase some lighting equipment! It's just the basics, but I'm super excited to play with it all soon.

Unfortunately, I didn't have enough money to buy everything I wanted, but I was looking online and there are many DIY projects that I can try out (i.e. DIY Softboxes). If I try it out, I'll let you know how it goes!

-Ashley

A Post on Aperture | "Get Down Low"

Well hello Monday. Most weeks I'm not a fan of this day. Today however, I feel surprisingly energetic and excited about the week to come. I must have gone mad.

So like I said the other day, I would explain about aperture another day. Well, it's that day, folks! I'll try to make it simple, as it can be confusing.

Aperture, according to wikipedia is, "a hole or an opening through which light travels." So if you were to hold up your lens, not attached to the body, and you were to look through it, you'll see the hole in the lens. That is what we're talking about.

Around the hole are these ring like things that will open/close depending on how you set your aperture in your camera. When you set an aperture, they are called f/stop or f/numbers (f/1.4, f/22, etc.). There is actually a ratio and math that makes these numbers work, which you can read about here. For my purposes, I don't think it's necessary to explain all of that. If you were in photography class, you'd need to learn this though! :) Look at the chart below to see what I'm talking about with these f/numbers.

http://www.school-of-digital-photography.com/2012/08/what-is-aperture-in-photography.html

http://www.school-of-digital-photography.com/2012/08/what-is-aperture-in-photography.html

Obviously, the smaller the hole (f/22), the less light comes in and the larger the hole (f/2.8), more light comes in. When a lot of light comes into your lens, things become blurry around your subject. It makes a shallow depth of field and has nice bokeh. The picture below is shot at an aperture of f/1.4:

Aperture in this photo: f/1.4

Aperture in this photo: f/1.4

However, when your aperture is smaller, it allows less light to come in, making more in focus in your picture. It increases your depth of field. The picture below was shot at an aperture of f/3.2. This aperture actually isn't that much smaller, but you can see that even with that small change it completely changes the picture.

Aperture in this photo: f/3.2

Aperture in this photo: f/3.2

Aperture can be fun to play with. yet very necessary to master when it comes to taking pictures. If you have your aperture set to wide on the wrong shot, say like a group photo, then only a few people will come in focus, and the rest will be blurry. If you're getting paid for that, then your customer might not be so happy (trust me, I know from experience messing up!). 

So all this to say, practice is so important! Start a project, try different things and become proficient at your camera and it will make you such a better photographer. 

I hope this shed some light on aperture! Feel free to ask any questions!

-Ashley